The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response

Cite this

The 2016 wildfire of Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, was a major natural disaster. It started on May 1 in a “remote part of forest southwest of Fort McMurray” (The Canadian Press, 2016). On the same day’s night, a local emergency was declared, and the first evacuation orders were issued (The Canadian Press, 2016). The fire is almost under control, but the atmospheric conditions change overnight, causing the situation to deteriorate by May 3 (The Canadian Press, 2016). The fire expanded rapidly, growing to 26km2, then 850km2 on May 5, and 2000km2 on May 7 (The Canadian Press, 2016). It caused significant damage to the town and kept moving north, threatening the surrounding oilsand work camps (The Canadian Press, 2016). The fire was finally deemed to be under control on July 4 (The Canadian Press). The total damage it caused makes it the costliest disaster in Canadian history.

Cut 15% OFF your first order
We’ll deliver a custom Public Administration paper tailored to your requirements with a good discount
Use discount
322 specialists online

Although the government’s response to the wildfire was fast, it was controversial. An official state of emergency was declared on May 4 (CTVNews.ca Staff, 2016). Over 88,000 residents of the area have been evacuated, but an estimated 2400 structures were destroyed, and the total damage, including environmental losses, is estimated at $9 billion (Alberta Government; GlobalNews.ca Staff, 2017). Besides evacuation aid, the government’s role in recovery aid included funding non-governmental and indigenous organizations supporting the recovery of the area, as well as relief funding for small businesses, totaling $30 million (Alberta Government). Other initiatives funded as part of the recovery efforts include mental health assistance, temporary housing for the evacuees, and improved environmental monitoring (Alberta Government). The recovery effort is still ongoing and is estimated to be completed in 2021.

Works Cited

Alberta Government. Home Again: Rrecovery After the Wood Buffalo Wildfire. Web.

CTVews.ca Staff. “Evacuation Order Expanded Ahead of Fort McMurray Fire.” CTVNews, Web.

GlobalNews.ca Staff. “Fort McMurray Wildfire: Study Pegs Cost of Lost Buildings, Income and Environmental Damage at $8.9B.” GlobalNews.ca, Web.

The Canadian Press. “A timeline of the Fort McMurray Wildfire, Canada’s News Story of 2016.” CityNews, Web.

On-Time Delivery!
Get your customised and 100% plagiarism-free paper done in as little as 3 hours
Let’s start
322 specialists online

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

DemoEssays. (2022, September 13). The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response. Retrieved from https://demoessays.com/the-fort-mcmurray-wildfire-and-government-response/

Reference

DemoEssays. (2022, September 13). The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response. https://demoessays.com/the-fort-mcmurray-wildfire-and-government-response/

Work Cited

"The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response." DemoEssays, 13 Sept. 2022, demoessays.com/the-fort-mcmurray-wildfire-and-government-response/.

References

DemoEssays. (2022) 'The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response'. 13 September.

References

DemoEssays. 2022. "The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response." September 13, 2022. https://demoessays.com/the-fort-mcmurray-wildfire-and-government-response/.

1. DemoEssays. "The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response." September 13, 2022. https://demoessays.com/the-fort-mcmurray-wildfire-and-government-response/.


Bibliography


DemoEssays. "The Fort McMurray Wildfire and Government Response." September 13, 2022. https://demoessays.com/the-fort-mcmurray-wildfire-and-government-response/.