Policing Principles by Sir Robert Peels

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In 1829, Sir Robert Peel’s proposed ideals that were effective in ensuring collective peace and welfare under the constitution. The principles are still applicable, and they are used in community policing organizations and law enforcement agencies. While the principles are not formally recognized as an ethical code, they are focused on moral and ethical standards in law enforcement. The goal of police organizations is crime prevention and law enforcement. The phrase commonly used to show this is “serve and protect” policy. The first peeling theory, which notes that the police’s mission is to deter violence and disorder, clearly reflects this driving principle. The second peeling theory also implies that police officers’ right to conduct their duties is contingent on public recognition of their conduct (Peel, 2018). This has been underlined by the media, where they can question any form of law enforcement and government activities.

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The citizens should be able and ready to accept laws made, and if the same regulations are unreasonable, they have the right to resist. Due to media and technology, the public can be aware of the laws established and the reasoning behind the rules. This is outlined by the third peeling principle, which states that in order to obtain and preserve public confidence, police should gain the support and cooperation of the citizens in mutual observance of the law (Kang & Choi, 2019). The fifth peeling theory further emphasizes that police officers cannot seek or maintain public support by consistently showing utter impartiality in their enforcement of the law (Harvey, 2013). This is where law enforcers must serve everyone irrespective of their race, finances, and politics. If the law is obligated in the current world, it results in public and media scrutiny.

The most effective principle is where the public is allowed to have an opinion on the establishment of laws. This enables them to participate; hence, the regulations that will be made will be in their favor, according to the third peeling principle. For example, in 2009, the death of Ian Tomlinson, whom a police officer struck during a summit protest, sparked the debate on the relationship between the police, public, and media. In response to the concerns, a report was established by the chief inspector. Through this case, the second peeling principle was applied, where the public can question the police department’s actions.

References

Harvey, P. (2013). Policeman. YouTube. Web.

Kang, Y., & Choi, N. (2019). Understanding the effectiveness of performance management system. Policing: An International Journal, 42(5), 847-862. Web.

Peel, G. (2018). Sir Robert Peel. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Web.

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DemoEssays. (2022, August 25). Policing Principles by Sir Robert Peels. Retrieved from https://demoessays.com/policing-principles-by-sir-robert-peels/

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DemoEssays. (2022) 'Policing Principles by Sir Robert Peels'. 25 August.

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DemoEssays. 2022. "Policing Principles by Sir Robert Peels." August 25, 2022. https://demoessays.com/policing-principles-by-sir-robert-peels/.

1. DemoEssays. "Policing Principles by Sir Robert Peels." August 25, 2022. https://demoessays.com/policing-principles-by-sir-robert-peels/.


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DemoEssays. "Policing Principles by Sir Robert Peels." August 25, 2022. https://demoessays.com/policing-principles-by-sir-robert-peels/.