Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business

Cite this

The tragedy of September 11, 2001, has marked the new development course of the American army against international terrorism and has significantly changed the organization of the military forces. Post-9/11 veterans have been exposed to combat more frequently compared to the previous military generations and, therefore, have a distinguished mindset (Parker et al., 2019). The military mindset is generally associated with such qualities as teamwork, leadership, resilience, and discipline, which are highly praised in military organizations and the civilian workforce (Pollak & Arsbanapalli, 2019). Unfortunately, despite the growing number of post-9/11 veterans in the country, the competitive advantages of this group in the business setting are significantly under-researched (Aronson et al., 2019). The current doctoral study project attempts to narrow down the research gap and investigate the benefits of the military mindset in the business setting on the example of post-9/11 veterans.

Background

It is commonly acknowledged that post-9/11 veterans have a unique skillset and mindset from their previous military experience, which can be used to amplify their productivity in the civilian workforce. Previous research has found that both military veterans and civilians associate military mindset with such qualities as teamwork, leadership, resilience, and discipline (Parker et al., 2019). The said competencies might significantly improve the productivity of employees and positively affect the organizational culture in the business setting (Stackhouse, 2020). Therefore, it is essential to provide a thorough description of these qualities, examine their potential effect on the business groups and internal workspace, and evaluate the efficiency of the intentional hiring strategies of post-9/11 veterans.

At present, the general qualities of a military mindset are relatively well-studied; nevertheless, the transmission of post-9/11 veterans to the civilian workforce is heavily under-researched. The research gap includes the competitive advantages of post-9/11 military veterans in the business setting, the potential difficulties of transmission from military force to civilian occupations, and the understanding of HR specialists and managers concerning intentional hiring strategies of veterans. Currently, there are more than three million post-9/11 veterans not enlisted in the military organizations in the United States, and the number might reach four million in the next five years (Aronson et al., 2019). The statistics imply that the post-9/11 veterans will constitute a larger portion of the potential employees in the upcoming years, and it is essential to identify the competitive advantages of the target group in the business setting and examine the efficiency of the hiring strategies.

The core qualities of a military mindset include teamwork, leadership, resilience, and discipline, and all these competencies might significantly affect the organizational culture of the company. A large number of scientific studies have been conducted in order to comprehensively analyze the said competencies. Nevertheless, the academic works generally address the general qualities of a military mindset without the context; as a result, the peculiarities of the mindset of the post-9/11 veterans are heavily under-researched. As mentioned briefly before, post-9/11 veterans have undergone a more intense exposure to combat, a higher percentage of deployment, and more stressful military experience compared to previous generations (Parker et al., 2019). The differences in combat experience reflect in the acquired skillsets and mindsets of the veterans; therefore, it is essential to thoroughly investigate the peculiarities of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans, specifically.

The current doctoral project utilizes the two primary conceptual frameworks – constructivism and Schein Model – to evaluate the said qualities and assess their impact on the organizational culture. Constructivism is a complex terminology, which has diverse uses in psychology, sociology, and politics; however, in the scope of the current work, constructivism is acknowledged as an approach to the qualities of the military mindset by transparently assessing each of the interrelated concepts. Schein Model is a theoretical model that evaluates the effect of the military mindset on the organizational culture (Schein, 2016). Ultimately, the application of the chosen frameworks might provide beneficial insights into the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans and narrow down the research gap. A thorough description of the two models is presented in Chapter 2.

The current doctoral study project focuses on the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans and examines the said phenomenon in the setting of one organization – Yorktown Systems Group. The focus on a single organizational entity allows to narrow down the scope of the work and conduct in-depth qualitative research to learn the perspectives of both post-9/11 veterans and HR specialists. The previous research and the hypothesis of the current study suggest that the qualities and competencies of post-9/11 veterans differ significantly from the previous military generations. Therefore, it is essential to acquire empirical data from post-9/11 veterans and HR specialists who are currently employed in operating business organizations. As a result, the selected company for the current project is Yorktown Systems Group; a thorough description of the organization and location of the study are presented in Chapter 2. Evidently, the findings of one case study cannot be generalized to the whole population of post-9/11 veterans in the United States; nevertheless, such research design is necessary to ensure in-depth research and reliable results.

Ultimately, the research gap in the current academic field primarily concerns the analysis of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans, in particular. The growing number of post-9/11 veterans in the United States is a significant matter of social and practical concern due to the lack of specific research on the topic. Therefore, the findings of the current project might prove to be highly beneficial on both organizational and societal levels and provide extensive information for both post-9/11 veterans and HR specialists of business groups. A comprehensive overview of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans is necessary to further advance the academic and practical progress concerning the topic.

Statement of the Problem

Having examined the theoretical background of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans, it is possible to identify the research gap and state the research problem. The research gap is represented by the lack of sufficient literature concerning the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans, specifically. A large number of studies present comprehensive data in regard to various qualities of a military mindset, such as teamwork, leadership, resilience, and discipline, and provide sufficient evidence of the utmost importance of these competencies in the business setting (Pollak & Arsbanapalli, 2019). Consequently, the statistics demonstrate the significant differences between the military experience and combat exposure of post-9/11 veterans and previous military generations (Parker et al., 2019). In theory, the contrast between pre-9/11 and post-9/11 veterans should establish certain differences in the mindsets of the soldiers, and they should be reflected in the transmission from the military setting to the civilian workforce. However, there is a lack of scientific studies regarding the uniqueness of the mindsets of each retrospective group, and additional research is necessary.

Nevertheless, the lack of research alone is not a sufficient reason for additional studies, and the significance of the problem should be established. In the current case, the problem is highly relevant on individual, organizational, and societal levels. As mentioned briefly before, the overall number of post-9/11 veterans is gradually increasing and is projected to reach four million people outside of military service in the next five years (Aronson et al., 2019). On the individual level, the statistics imply the growing competition and additional difficulties in transitioning to the civilian workforce among post-9/11 veterans (McCormick et al., 2019).

On the organizational level, HR specialists and managers of business groups might have a vague understanding of the potential benefits and competitive advantages that post-9/11 veterans bring to the organizational culture due to the lack of research in this field (Stackhouse, 2020). Lastly, further analysis of the current problem might have a beneficial impact on the societal level by promoting government programs and services concerning the transition of post-9/11 veterans to civilian life (Morgan et al., 2020). Ultimately, the lack of research and significance of the issue transparently indicate the necessity of the current doctoral study project.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this qualitative case study is to investigate the benefits of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans in the business setting. According to the problem statement and purpose of the project, the appropriate research method, design, sampling type, and setting are selected. The current doctoral study project utilizes the qualitative research method to ensure in-depth research of the analyzed phenomenon. The qualitative method is chosen according to the problem statement since it is essential to provide non-numerical data, including narratives, perspectives, and attitudes, of both post-9/11 veterans and HR specialists concerning the topic. On the other hand, quantitative research might be used as a supplementary source of information in similar research; however, it fails to address the problem statement of the project and, therefore, should not be used as a major method of data collection (Basias & Pollalis, 2018). Consequently, the implemented research design in the current project is a case study due to the sole focus on one organizational entity.

The participants of the study include the employees of Yorktown Systems Group – namely, post-9/11 veterans of various occupations, HR specialists, and executives of the company. The three target groups will be asked to participate in interviews, questionnaires, and surveys in a sequential manner. The guidelines for interviews and questions in surveys focus on the topic presented in the problem statement and purpose of the project; however, they differ slightly depending on the target group. The three sources of data collection ensure the reliability and validity of the collected data, and the different questions guarantee a more comprehensive overview of the topic.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to conduct interviews directly at the geographic location of Yorktown Systems Group due to the risks of COVID-19 and consequent restrictions. Therefore, the interviews, questionnaires, and surveys will be conducted via online applications, such as Skype or Zoom, depending on the availability of the software. A comprehensive overview of the methodology is presented in Chapter 3. Ultimately, the chosen research method and the purpose statement are appropriate to address the research problem.

Conceptual Framework

The theoretical background and conceptual framework comprise the foundation for the project and ensure the logical structure and organization of the research. As mentioned briefly before, the current DSP utilizes two primary conceptual models – constructivism and the Schein Model of organizational culture. One of the proposed hypotheses of the current research is that the mindset of post-9/11 veterans differs significantly from the mindsets of previous military generations due to more intense exposure to combat (Parker et al., 2019). Constructivism supports this assumption and states that every skill or competency is learned and affected significantly by empirical experience and social context (Johnson, 2019). A large number of researchers have provided sufficient evidence concerning the learning-based nature of such skills as leadership and discipline, which are the core features of the military mindset (Kirchner & Akdere, 2017). Therefore, the application of constructivism to the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans might provide insights into the acquisition of certain skills and their relevance in the business setting.

The second conceptual framework implemented in the DSP is the Schein Model. Unlike constructivism, the Schein Model is used not to determine the nature of the acquired competencies but to examine the application of the said skills in organizational culture (Schein, 2016). According to the theory, the competencies and previous experience of the employees directly affect the company and the relationships between the workers (Schein, 2016). The primary elements of organizational culture include behavior, espoused values, and basic assumptions (Schein, 2016). In the scope of the current work, the model implies that the unique experience of post-9/11 veterans might benefit the organizational culture by stimulating discipline and a culture of respect. Consequently, the exposure to socially praised qualities, such as leadership and teamwork, might enhance the overall atmosphere in the company and reduce the prominence of hidden assumptions, such as sexism, racism, and other forms of prejudice (Schein, 2016). Ultimately, the Schein Model is an appropriate choice of a theoretical model to determine the influence of the post-9/11 veterans on the organizational culture.

As a result, the application of the two presented conceptual frameworks in data collection and analysis might provide beneficial insights concerning the unique nature of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans and its relevance in the business setting. Both models are widely accepted in the academic community and have been used prior for similar research objectives (Kirchner & Akdere, 2017; Schein, 2016). Ultimately, constructivism and the Schein Model are appropriate theoretical models for the current project. The details and of the two presented conceptual frameworks are presented in Chapter 2.

Research Questions

The open-ended research questions of the current project align with the purpose statement and the conceptual framework described in the previous sub-chapters and are presented below:

  • RQ1. What are the unique qualities of the military mindset of post-9/11 era veterans?
  • RQ2. How can the adoption of the military mindset of post-9/11 era veterans impact the company culture?
  • RQ3. What are common competitive advantages that businesses achieve through the hiring of post-9/11 era veterans?
  • RQ4. What are the benefits of the intentional hiring of post-9/11 veterans from a human resource perspective?

The first research question concerns the unique nature of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans, while the rest address the impact of the military mindset on the organizational structure. The guidelines for semi-structured interviews and questions in surveys are based on the said research questions and differ slightly, depending on the target group. The derived questions for each of the target groups are presented in Appendix C.

Method and Design Overview

The current project utilizes the qualitative research method and case study research design. The qualitative approach ensures the in-depth analysis of the topic and aligns with the purpose statement and research questions. Contrary to quantitative methods, qualitative case studies emphasize non-numerical data, such as narratives, perspectives, beliefs, and attitudes (Basias & Pollalis, 2018). The primary data collection methods implemented in the current work are interviews, questionnaires, and surveys. The simultaneous use of three various sources of information is called triangulation, and it ensures the validity and reliability of the gathered data (Alam, 2020). The primary advantages of the qualitative research method are in-depth analysis, the proximity of the researcher to the target group, and the adaptability of the approach to the goals and research questions (Queirós, Faria & Almeida, 2017). As a result, qualitative research is appropriate for exploratory studies with an emphasis on certain phenomenon.

The sampling for the study is determined via criterion strategy, and the sample size ranges from fifteen to twenty-five participants, which is the appropriate number for qualitative studies (Moser & Korstjens, 2018). Consequently, the collected data is processed and analyzed via both the manual examination and web-based software Dedoose. The interview audio recordings are transcribed via Dedoose, and the data is processed via pre-determined coding schemes. Such an approach is called deductive coding and is frequently utilized in qualitative studies to restrict the scope of study and ensure the in-depth analysis of the examined phenomenon (Linneberg & Korsgaard, 2019). Ultimately, the data is further investigated via the content analysis method, and the primary meaning units are determined, including themes, categories, codes, and condensed meaning units (Erlingsson & Brysiewicz, 2017). As a result, the current doctoral project utilizes the qualitative case study research design; the primary data collection methods are interviews, questionnaires, and surveys; the data is processed via deductive coding and interpreted via content analysis.

Significance of the Study

As mentioned before, the current doctoral study project is significant on the individual, organizational, and societal levels, and addresses the relevant problems concerning the differences between pre-9/11 and post-9/11 military generations. Furthermore, despite the growing number of post-9/11 veterans, the topic is heavily under-researched in the academic community, and not many organizations are aware of the potential benefits of a military mindset in the business setting (Davis & Minnis, 2017). From these considerations, it is essential to conduct additional studies to further understand the phenomenon and increase the awareness of all the stakeholders in regard to the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans.

The current research might directly benefit the veterans by informing them concerning the potential competitive advantages that certain qualities of a military mindset are associated with. This information will promote the overall understanding of the military mindset and business culture among the post-9/11 veterans and mitigate the difficulties of transitioning to the civilian workforce. The HR specialists and executives of business groups benefit from the comprehensive overview of the military mindset and associated competencies. The results of the study might also promote additional government programs and grants, thus, making positive societal change. Lastly, the study contributes to the academic community by advancing scientific progress in the field. Ultimately, the findings of the current study might have a positive impact on the individual, organizational, and societal levels in regard to the topic.

Definition of Key Terms

The key terms in the current project are the following:

  • Military mindset. A state of mind characterized by such qualities as teamwork, leadership, resilience, and discipline, acquired by intensive training, combat exposure, and military experience (Kirchner & Akdere, 2019).
  • Post-9/11 veterans. Service members enlisted in the military force after September 11, 2001, and are currently not registered in military organizations (Parker et al., 2019).
  • Organizational culture. A set of beliefs, values, behaviors, interrelationships, and structures unique to one particular organizational entity (Schein, 2016).
  • Resilience. “The capacity to overcome the negative effects of setback and associated stress on military performance and combat effectiveness” (Nindl et al., 2018).
  • Constructivism. A conceptual framework that implies the learning-based acquisition of skills and competencies via culture, training, and social context (Johnson, 2019).
  • Schein Model. A conceptual framework of organizational culture, emphasizing the impact of beliefs, values, attitudes, and relationships among the workers on the overall productivity and atmosphere of the organization (Schein, 2016).
  • Artifacts.Visible organizational structures and processes occurring in the workspace (hard to decipher)” according to the Schein Model of organizational culture (Schein, 2016).
  • Espoused Values. “Strategies, goals, and philosophies (espoused justifications)” (Schein, 2016).
  • Basic Assumptions. “Unconscious, taken-for-granted beliefs, perceptions, thoughts, and feelings (ultimate source of values and action)” (Schein, 2016).

Summary

The American government has chosen a new course of military development after the tragedy of September 11, 2001, to oppose international terrorism and protect the country. As a result, the service members enlisted after September 11, 2001, have had more intense training regimes, more frequent exposure to combat, and higher deployment rates compared to previous military generations (Parker et al., 2019). The differences between pre-9/11 and post-9/11 veterans imply the changes in the military mindset and acquired skillsets between the two groups. However, at present, there is a noticeable lack of research on the mindset of post-9/11 veterans, specifically, and the potential competitive advantages of this target group in the civilian workforce. Therefore, the purpose of the current project is to investigate the benefits of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans in the business setting.

The proposed research plan for the current study is to investigate the perspectives and attitudes of the Yorktown Systems Group’s employees, including post-9/11 veterans, HR specialists, and executives of the company. The project utilizes a qualitative case study to ensure in-depth research of the phenomenon and to answer the proposed research questions. The sampling size for the study is approximately twenty participants. The data collection methods include interviews, questionnaires, and surveys. Consequently, the data is processed via deductive coding and analyzed via content analysis according to the two selected conceptual frameworks – constructivism and the Schein Model of organizational structure. The most significant meaning units, such as themes, categories, and concepts, are identified to further understand the perspectives of post-9/11 veterans and HR specialists in regard to the topic. The findings of the project demonstrate the unique nature of the military mindset of post-9/11 veterans and the competitive advantages of the target group in the business setting, which, in theory, might have a positive impact on the individual, organizational, and societal levels.

References

Alam. M. K. (2020). A systematic qualitative case study: Questions, data collection, NVivo analysis and saturation. Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal. Web.

Aronson, K. R., et al. (2019). Post-9/11 veteran transitions to civilian life: Predictors of the use of employment programs. Journal of Veterans Studies, 5(1), 14-22. Web.

Basias, N., & Pollalis, Y. (2018). Quantitative and qualitative research in business & technology: Justifying a suitable research methodology. Review of Integrative Business & Economics, 7(1), 91-105.

Davis, V. E., & Minnis, S. E. (2017). Military veterans’ transferrable skills: An HRD practitioner dilemma. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 19(1), 6-13. Web.

Erlingsson, C., & Brysiewicz, P. (2017). A hands-on guide to doing content analysis. African Journal of Emergency Medicine, 7, 93-99. Web.

Johnson, A. P. (2019). Essential learning theories: Applications to authentic teaching situations. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Kirchner, M., & Akdere, M. (2017). Military leadership development strategies: Implications for training in non-military organizations. Industrial and Commercial Training, 49(7/8), 357-364. Web.

Kirchner, M., & Akdere, M. (2019). An empirical investigation of the acquisition of leadership KSAa in the U.S. Army: Implications for veterans’ career transitions. Journal of Veterans Studies, 4(1), 110-127. Web.

Linneberg, M. S., & Korsgaard, S. (2019). Coding qualitative data: A synthesis guiding the novice. Qualitative Research Journal, 19(3), 259-270. Web.

McCormick, W. H., Currier, J. M., Isaak, S. L., Sims, B. M., Slagel, B. A., Carroll, T. D., Hamner, K., & Albright, D. L. (2019). Military culture and post-military transitioning among veterans: A qualitative analysis. Journal of Veterans Studies, 4(2), 287-298.

Morgan, N. R., Aronson, K. R., Perkings, D. F., Bleser, J. A., Davenport, K., Vogt, D., Copeland, L. A., Finley, E. P., & Gilman, C. L. (2020). Reducing barriers to post-9/11 veterans’ use of programs and services as they transition to civilian life. Health Services Research, 20(525), 1-14. Web.

Moser, A., & Korstjens, I. (2017). Series: Practical guidance to qualitative research. Part 1: Introduction. European Journal of General Practice, 23(1), 271-273. Web.

Moser, A., & Korstjens, I. (2018). Series: Practical guidance to qualitative research. Part 3: Sampling, data collection and analysis. European Journal of General Practice, 24(1), 9-18. Web.

Nindl, B. C., Billing, D. C., Drain, J. R., Beckner, M. E., Greeves, J., Groeller, H., Teien, H., Marcora, S., Moffitt, A., Reilly, T., Taylor, N. A. S., Young, A. J., & Friedl, K. E. (2018). Perspectives on resilience for military readiness and preparedness: Report of an international military physiology roundtable. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 21, 1116-1124. Web.

Parker, K., Igielnik, R., Barroso, A., & Cilluffo, A. (2019). The American veteran experience and the post-9/11 generation. Web.

Pollak, N., Arsbanapalli, B., & Hobson, C. (2019). The business case for hiring military veterans/reservists: Stock price performance of military friendly firms. Journal of Veterans Studies, 4(2), 52-63. Web.

Queirós, A., Faria, D., & Almeida, F. (2017). Strengths and limitations of qualitative and quantitative research methods. European Journal of Education Studies, 3(9), 369-387. Web.

Schein, E. H. (2016). Organizational culture and leadership (5th ed.). Wiley.

Stackhouse, J. D. (2020). Hiring strategies for small business owner to recruit veterans (A multiple case study). Open Journal of Business and Management, 8(4), 1508-1535. Web.

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

DemoEssays. (2023, January 4). Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business. Retrieved from https://demoessays.com/military-mindset-of-post-9-11-veterans-for-business/

Reference

DemoEssays. (2023, January 4). Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business. https://demoessays.com/military-mindset-of-post-9-11-veterans-for-business/

Work Cited

"Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business." DemoEssays, 4 Jan. 2023, demoessays.com/military-mindset-of-post-9-11-veterans-for-business/.

References

DemoEssays. (2023) 'Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business'. 4 January.

References

DemoEssays. 2023. "Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business." January 4, 2023. https://demoessays.com/military-mindset-of-post-9-11-veterans-for-business/.

1. DemoEssays. "Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business." January 4, 2023. https://demoessays.com/military-mindset-of-post-9-11-veterans-for-business/.


Bibliography


DemoEssays. "Military Mindset of Post-9-11 Veterans for Business." January 4, 2023. https://demoessays.com/military-mindset-of-post-9-11-veterans-for-business/.